Alison Collection May 1943 | Little Rock

2021-11-10 05:45:27 By : Mr. Tommy Peng

Fighting the Hail De Gaulle in France, May 31, 1943. Algiers, North Africa-Just after his long-awaited arrival in North Africa, General de Gaulle (right) and General Henry Giro (left) left the airport outside Algiers to pay tribute to the fighting French soldiers. Although Giro did not announce that the fighting French leader would arrive on May 30, the Algerian crowd soon discovered his presence and ignored the ban on public demonstrations by shouting: "Long live de Gaulle" . Credit: OWI Radiophoto from ACME;

Heralding the unification of France, May 31, 1943. Algiers-After saluting and shaking hands with each other, General Charles de Gaulle (left) and General Henri Giro left the airport outside Algiers, where the French general landed on May 30 to attend the long-awaited meeting . A very special committee paid tribute to de Gaulle-the Vichy were excluded. Although there was no public announcement of the arrival of Charles de Gaulle, the gossip from North Africa attracted a cheering crowd, chanting "Long live Charles de Gaulle." Credit: OWI Radiophoto from ACME;

Between him and death, May 23, 1943. This ripped helmet is all between the time and death of the Wing Commander, Arthur Hay Donaldson, who led the Tornado in a recent low-altitude attack on Molex Airport. Explosive shells from ground turrets hit his plane, one of which went through his cockpit hood and tore his helmet. The RAF man was uninjured and was knocked into a coma, but he recovered quickly to prevent his cyclone plane from crashing and flew back to the 100-mile flight path back to his base. Credit: ACME;

USS MARBLEHEAD rescues the crew of an Army bomber, May 27, 1943. In the most recent rescue of this famous naval cruiser, four Army bomber crew members who were forced to land at sea were rescued by a whale boat from the aircraft carrier Marblehead. These people spent five days on a life raft in the dangerous ocean, without food, only 11 ounces of water. Credit: Closed. US Navy photos from Acme;

Inflation line, May 27, 1943. Somewhere in the UK-Royal Navy Mark VI balloons line up in a row in the inflatable shed where they are located. Because they help protect ships from air strikes, balloons are extremely valuable and are therefore used for draftsmen, trawlers, and other vessels. Image source: Acme;

"Tidewater Tillie" scored again, 5/25/1943. The crew of the U.S. Army Air Force Anti-Submarine Command equipped with a specially equipped Libertador B-24 bomber took this picture of a successful attack on a Nazi U submarine, proving that they had "killed." Once they attacked an enemy submarine, and it was considered "probable" because their photos did not ultimately indicate that the submarine ship was destroyed. This time, the photos of the attack and the debris on the surface after the attack made the "killing" inevitable. Here, after the depth bomb on the plane blasted the submarine to the bottom, the survivors of the crew clung to a cylindrical object, (left arrow), and others floating in the water, (far right arrow): Credit Line ( The US Army Aviation Mandatory Photo is from ACME);

"Tidewater Tillie" scored again – (#1), 5/25/1943. The crew of the U.S. Army Air Force Anti-Submarine Command equipped with a specially equipped Liberator B-24 bomber took this photo of the successful attack on the Nazi U-Boat, proving that they had "killed." Once, they attacked an enemy submarine and were considered only "possible" because their photos did not ultimately indicate that the submarine ship was destroyed. This time, the photos of the attack and the debris on the surface after the attack made the "killing" inevitable. Here, the B-24 bomb flew over the submarine, and the machine gun was burning. The arrow (left) shows a Nazi crew member hit by an American bullet and fell onto the deck. Another machine gun bullet splashed into the sea, (right arrow). After a few seconds, the depth bomb from the plane blasted the submarine to the bottom. Credit line (photo of the US Army and Air Force);

On May 22, 1943, Germany was also taken over by women. Somewhere in Germany—in Germany, as in every warring country, women have taken over men’s jobs. Although Hitler would let his women stay in the kitchen in peacetime, he is not opposed to recruiting their labor to advance his war. In this photo, a German farm woman is loading a milk truck, which was obtained through a neutral source credit line (ACME);

A new type of invasion barge, May 22, 1943. Ready to transport troops to where needed, this new type of invasion barge, the Navy’s LCI, crosses the waters of the Atlantic coast. This camouflaged ship operates under the naval amphibious force. Credit (U.S. Coast Guard Official Photo-ACME);

On May 27, 1943, the Nazis had Norwegians trembling. Oslo, Norway-Fearing that the Allied forces would invade Norway, the Nazis set up an anti-torpedo net at the port of Oslo. The Germans' war strength is being weakened by Allied bombs. They set themselves behind the coastal fortresses and are nervous about what is about to happen (ACME Radiophoto);

Invasion Nightmare, May 27, 1943. Oslo, Norway-The anti-torpedo net protecting the port of Oslo silently proved that the Nazis were afraid of invading northern Norway. In the background (left) is the country's largest Aix machinery factory and (right) the Oslo City Hall taken over by the Germans. Credit (ACME Radiophoto);

Part of Hitler's Fortress, May 21, 1943. CHANNEL COAST-As the Nazis became more and more nervous about the idea that the Allied forces might invade Europe in the near future, their coastal defenses were being strengthened at an even more fanatical rate. According to the German subtitles received from the Stockholm Credit Line (ACME Radiophoto) this morning, this is an anti-tank wall in the port area of ​​an unnamed city along the Strait;

Large business of Nazi ambulances, May 21, 1943. A wounded Nazi soldier has just returned from the battlefield to an ambulance. Although the original German subtitles did not give the location of this war scene, the snowy terrain indicated that it was somewhere on the Russian front. Photo courtesy of Clipper from the London Credit Line (ACME);

"This is the duty of every German...", May 22, 1943. Somewhere in Germany-"It is the responsibility of every German to keep old paper"-the head of state said that the German caption attached to this photo was obtained from a neutral source. In 1943, these women worked in the paper recycling movement in Germany, sorting old paper into baskets. Credit Line (ACME);

The "wounded" warbird returns home, May 21, 1943. American pilots inspected the broken tail of the American flying fortress. Despite the damage, the flying fortress managed to return to the base. This "wounded" warbird completed a spectacular return flight after taking part in the raid on Palermo, Sicily. Image source: American Signal Army Radio Telephone-ACME.

Overview of the Mediterranean, 5/20/1943. A British destroyer surrounded us a large number of potential Nazi fugitives 20 miles of land between Tunisia and Pantelleria. Most of these Nazis were anti-aircraft gunners of the Luftwaffe. If they fled to the Mediterranean islands, they would have a lot of business, because allied flyers kept beating it. Credit (ACME Radiophoto);

Another plaster of Pantelleria, May 28, 1943. The runways and planes of the Italian airport on Pantelleria Island have become the rubble of an increasing number of Axis wartime trash cans because they are covered by American flyers. The precise bombing of AAF bombers made the airports and facilities on the Italian side of the Mediterranean useless. Credit (U.S. Army Air Force Official Photo-ACME);

Acquired "Work", May 26, 1943. Italian prisoners of war captured in the latter part of the Tunisian campaign received their "works" in the desert barbershop set up inside the barbed wire barrier of the prisoner-of-war camp. Why do you dress up, boy, are you not going anywhere? Credit limit (from ACME’s OWI Radiophoto);

Hit the Italian liner directly, May 26, 1943. In this photo released today in Washington, a flying fortress just hit the huge Italian liner directly, it was converted into a carrier, and the smoke almost completely concealed the ship. The wake of the ship (pictured on the right, in the photo) shows that it is trying to swing in a large circle to avoid being hit by a bomb. This aircraft belongs to the Northwest African Strategic Air Force operating in the Mediterranean. Credit limit (U.S. Army Air Force photos from ACME);

The helicopter flies to the sea, May 25, 1943. A helicopter hovered over the small square marked on the deck of the tanker and landed in a small space to prove its value as a secondary fighter. In a recent demonstration in the Long Island Sound, the wingless aircraft made 24 landings and take-offs on the small deck of a moving tanker. This aircraft is called the Army Air Force R-4 helicopter and is a development project of AAF. Plans are underway to install a small deck on the Liberty ship to allow helicopters to perform anti-submarine missions at sea.

"The Main Force of War", May 31, 1943. The unprecedented combat record of the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise recently won her a unit award from President Roosevelt. The Navy revealed tonight that the damage caused by the five-year-old ship to the enemy is estimated to be eight to ten times more than her own cost. Aircraft, submarines, all types of enemy surface ships and shore facilities were destroyed or severely damaged by the aircraft on board the 19,900-ton aircraft carrier, the number hitting a record high. Credit (Official Photo of the U.S. Navy-ACME);

Spuds Ahoy! , May 23, 1943. Ceylon, India-Want to eat potatoes? Just take an ocean liner to Ceylon-there are a lot of potatoes. This is the housework that many American housewives want to take over-but for the Royal Air Force and Ceylon people, this is still KP, they peel, peel, and peel endless piles of potatoes. Credit: ACME;

Warscar, May 20, 1943. New Guinea-Although several months have passed since the Japanese and Allied forces have fought here, time and fast-growing jungle vegetation have not been able to erase the scars of the war from this battlefield in Buna, New Guinea. The naked, war-torn palm trees and jagged tree stumps still protrude from the dense foliage, telling the story of the fury that rages here. Credit Line-WP- (ACME);

Look up! , May 27, 1943. Attu—All eyes were focused anxiously on Aleutian's sky, and the American soldiers watched their aerial arms fly into the battlefield. Of course, when the US army started fighting on the westernmost island of the Aleutian Islands, the focus of the artillery was the Japanese on Mount Attu. Attu’s latest report suggests that the island’s rugged and rocky terrain may delay the last Allied attack on Japan. Credit Line (Official photos of the U.S. Navy from ACME);

Dual purpose, May 29, 1943. Attu – The warm fire on the cold beach of Attu serves a dual purpose. It cooked a hot meal in the Holz Bay area of ​​Attu Island and thawed the hands of these American sailors, and then landed there to expel or destroy the Japanese garrison. Even in May, cold weather clothing and those skies (foreground) come in handy in the Aleutian Islands. Credit (Official US Navy photo from ACME);

The first photo of our attack on Attu, May 26, 1943. On May 11, 1943, when the U.S. Army landed at Attu in the Aleutian Islands, a naval combat photography unit accompanied the first wave of U.S. forces to land on the Japanese-occupied Attu Island at the westernmost point of the Aleutian Islands. This photo was taken at the beginning of the attack and shows the landing craft placed on the side of the transport ship starting to move towards the beach. The destroyer's searchlight pierced the fog like a pencil. Credit Line (Official photos of the US Navy from ACME;

The first photo of the ascent and landing on the Attu on May 26, 1943. Washington, DC-This photo is the first photo of the U.S. military landing on a Japanese-controlled island on May 11 last year. It was taken by a naval combat photographer and was released today in Washington. Photographers who took these landing photos at two points on the island, Holocaust Bay and Holz Bay, were repeatedly exposed to Japanese artillery fire. Here, the US military advances in front of enemy fire. This is a front-line photo taken when a fog is rolling in. When this photo was taken, Japanese bullets were singing. Credit Line (US Navy photo from ACME);

A bomb over Naaru, May 28, 1943. As U.S. bombs found their tracks on the South Pacific islands in the Gilbert Island group in the northeast of Guadalcanal, the Jap Phosphate Factory on Nauru issued heavy smoke. Five to seven Japanese Zero planes were shot down in the Nauru airstrike, and the American planes were not lost. Funafuti Island is the largest island in the Ellis Islands. It was occupied by the US military in April and used to be the base of the attackers. Image source (Photo of the US Army Air Force comes from ACME);

On May 29, 1943, the materials came to Attu. Attu - Boxes of supplies were scattered on Attu Beach because the landing barge brought more supplies for American soldiers. The equipment will be transported to the inland via newly built roads that cross the black stripes at the top of the photo. The latest reports from Attu indicate that the troubled Japanese in Chicago and Sabana Bay area gave in again before the US military attack and are now moving forward to eliminate the remnants of enemy forces still on the island. Credit Line (Official U.S. Navy) from ACME's photo);

On May 27, 1943, "Ancient Glory" prevailed. Attu-The American flag fluttered from the mast of this captured Japanese landing craft, and our people took it to the beach of Attu's Massacre Bay. The latest reports from Aleutian Island indicate that intense hand-to-hand combat is taking place in the pristine wilderness of Attu, and it is believed that the US military is using bayonets and grenades to break through death traps. Credit line (official photo of the US Navy) from ACME);

On May 20, 1943, the Allied forces attacked Saramau. This photo, released today in Washington, shows that allied bombs have recently emitted heavy smoke from a fire triggered by a Japanese-controlled base in Saramau, New Guinea. The wing of one of the bombers that carried out the raid is shown at the bottom left (above). It was announced today that Allied aircraft had once again attacked Saramau, attacked airports and towns, and opened fire at enemy installations along the Francisco River. Credit Line (Photo from ACME by US Army Aviation);

On May 19, 1943, the Americans made progress on ATTU. The advance patrols of the US troops that landed in the Holz Bay and Holocaust Bay areas have joined. The center of the photo shows the towing arm of Holz Bay. The US army attacked the Japanese position and occupied the area on the high ground between the arms. As troops from Holocaust Bay (not shown) advanced north, Holtz Bay troops occupied the high mountain ridge in the southeast (from the center of the picture to the left). The advance forces in Holocaust Bay and Holz Bay met in a passage and had cleared the enemy. The troops retreated to Chichagov Port (lower left corner). Atu Village is the only settlement on the island, facing the Port of Chichagov. Image source: US Navy photos from ACME.

This is a lie, May 20, 1943. New Guinea-Deep in the center of the Sananadah jungle in New Guinea, long slender tombstones protrude from the leaves, marking the resting place of the Japanese who clashed with the Allied forces. War correspondent Tom Yarbrough reads the inscription from the tomb of Rotsune Yamamoto of the Japanese Navy. Credit: ACME;

Stepping stones in Burma, May 21, 1943. Myanmar-Stepping stones help Allied soldiers and their supply mules cross the jungle stream on the narrow road to Myanmar. Through jungles, forests and mountains; this road must be used as a supply route for the Allies until the Japanese can be chased from Burma and the Burma road is reopened. The key for China is to obtain military assistance before launching a successful offensive against the Japanese Empire. Myanmar may be the focus of the long-term Pacific strategic discussions currently held in Washington. Credit: ACME.

Jungle Bath, May 21, 1943. Myanmar-People from the Ubud Dubu tribe wash their sweat from their bodies and clothes in the rocky jungle stream on the new supply road to Myanmar. The tribe members helped the Allies cut off a supply route that traverses miles of jungle, forest, and mountains—these routes must serve the Allies before the Burmese highway is reopened. Credit: ACME.

The winding road to Myanmar, May 21, 1943. Myanmar - A convoy of jeep drove slowly along the narrow winding road to Myanmar, transporting supplies to the Allied forces stationed there. The route army was built in less than six months. It was a long slender belt winding through miles of mountains, jungles and dense forests. In Washington’s ongoing Pacific long-range strategic discussions, Myanmar is most likely to be the focus of attention because it is the key to China and must be used to attack the Japanese empire. This small supply route had to serve the Allied forces until the Japanese were repelled from Burma and the Burmese highway was reopened. Credit: ACME.

Enter the battle from the side, 5/271943. Attu-Two landing crafts were hoisted high from one of the ships that brought American troops to Attu to harass the Japanese on the westernmost islands of the Aleutian Islands. Full of rare fighters. On May 11, ships like this glide on the shores of the Attu massacre and Holz Bay, carrying the fighting rights of the Japanese. It is believed that intense hand-to-hand combat is currently taking place in Attu, with the American hands on the top. Credit: ACME.

Japanese barbarism in Jiangxi Province, May 21, 1943. In October 1942, in the footage of Reverend Vincent, who was a missionary in Jiangxi Province, China, the barbaric Japanese army visited the countryside to provide assistance to General Jimmy Doolittle and his men. The town brings death and destruction. It eloquently records the suffering of the Chinese at the hands of a cruel and revenge-seeking Japan. Three priests and five American Sisters of Charity hid in the mountains when the town was razed to the ground, and took these photos from China. These photos show violence that far exceeds the destruction caused by modern bombing attacks. The Chinese were brutally tortured and executed collectively. Although the Japanese had two goals-the airport and the 200-mile railway from Yingtan to Zhejiang Qinnu, the general behavior of the railway was a punitive act because the American pilots got food and treatment here after the attack in 1942. On April 18, 2008, eight missionaries fled China after the raid. They walked, took a bus, and finally took a boat and plane. They arrived in the Western Hemisphere five months later. These photos were obtained in St. Louis from Father Paul Lloyd, director of the Vincent Foreign Missionary Association, and Father George Yager, Vincent who witnessed the attack and provided explanations for the following photos. The Japanese occupying forces hiding in the mountains destroyed their mission and farmers’ homes, and they stayed at home to be tortured and killed. The missionary ate in the woods. From left to right: Father Tom Smith, Bishop Charles Quinn, Father William Klein, Father William Stein and Father Chin. Credit: ACME.

Japanese barbarism in Jiangxi Province, May 21, 1943. In October 1942, in the footage of Reverend Vincent, who was a missionary in Jiangxi Province, China, the barbaric Japanese army visited the countryside to provide assistance to General Jimmy Doolittle and his men. The town brings death and destruction. It eloquently records the suffering of the Chinese at the hands of a cruel and revenge-seeking Japan. Three priests and five American Sisters of Charity hid in the mountains when the town was razed to the ground, and took these photos from China. These photos show violence that far exceeds the destruction caused by modern bombing attacks. The Chinese were brutally tortured and executed collectively. Although the Japanese had two goals-the airport and the 200-mile railway from Yingtan to Zhejiang Qinnu, the general behavior of the railway was a punitive act because the American pilots got food and treatment here after the attack in 1942. On April 18, 2008, eight missionaries fled China after the raid. They walked, took a bus, and finally took a boat and plane. They arrived in the Western Hemisphere five months later. These photos were obtained in St. Louis from Father Paul Lloyd, director of the Vincent Foreign Missionary Association, and Father George Yager, Vincent who witnessed the attack and provided explanations for the following photos. Father Frederick Maguire of Philadelphia (third from left) Father Tom McManus of Ireland (middle) and an unidentified doctor in Nancheng (not Nanchang) investigate and leave as the Japanese prepare for rescue work Under the ruins. Two Chinese villagers, one of the few survivors of the vicious attack, walked past the destroyed buildings in frustration. Credit: ACME.

Japanese barbarism in Jiangxi Province, May 21, 1943. In October 1942, in the footage of Reverend Vincent, who was a missionary in Jiangxi Province, China, the barbaric Japanese army visited the countryside to provide assistance to General Jimmy Doolittle and his men. The town brings death and destruction. It eloquently records the suffering of the Chinese at the hands of a cruel and revenge-seeking Japan. Three priests and five American Sisters of Charity hid in the mountains when the town was razed to the ground, and took these photos from China. These photos show violence that far exceeds the destruction caused by modern bombing attacks. The Chinese were brutally tortured and executed collectively. Although the Japanese had two goals-the airport and the 200-mile railway from Yingtan to Zhejiang Qinnu, the general behavior of the railway was a punitive act because the American pilots got food and treatment here after the attack in 1942. On April 18, 2008, eight missionaries fled China after the raid. They walked, took a bus, and finally took a boat and plane. They arrived in the Western Hemisphere five months later. These photos were obtained in St. Louis from Father Paul Lloyd, director of the Vincent Foreign Missionary Association, and Father George Yager, Vincent who witnessed the attack and provided explanations for the following photos. Even the Chinese church failed to escape the demolition in a raid by the Japanese army. This is the back view of Yingtan Church after the Japanese abandoned the city. Credit: ACME;

Japanese barbarism in Jiangxi Province, May 21, 1943. In October 1942, in the footage of Reverend Vincent, who was a missionary in Jiangxi Province, China, the barbaric Japanese army visited the countryside to provide assistance to General Jimmy Doolittle and his men. The town brings death and destruction. It eloquently records the suffering of the Chinese at the hands of a cruel and revenge-seeking Japan. Three priests and five American Sisters of Charity hid in the mountains when the town was razed to the ground, and took these photos from China. These photos show violence that far exceeds the destruction caused by modern bombing attacks. The Chinese were brutally tortured and executed collectively. Although the Japanese had two goals-the airport and the 200-mile railway from Yingtan to Zhejiang Qinnu, the general behavior of the railway was a punitive act because the American pilots got food and treatment here after the attack in 1942. On April 18, 2008, eight missionaries fled China after the raid. They walked, took a bus, and finally took a boat and plane. They arrived in the Western Hemisphere five months later. These photos were obtained in St. Louis from Father Paul Lloyd, director of the Vincent Foreign Missionary Association, and Father George Yager, Vincent who witnessed the attack and provided explanations for the following photos. The American Sisters of Charity raised their skirts high and splashed in the mountain stream, fleeing the fast approaching Japanese saboteurs. The sisters abandoned their traditional headwear during the flight to prevent the large white headwear from attracting the attention of the aircraft. Credit: ACME.

Japanese barbarism in Jiangxi Province, May 21, 1943. In October 1942, in the footage of Reverend Vincent, who was a missionary in Jiangxi Province, China, the barbaric Japanese army visited the countryside to provide assistance to General Jimmy Doolittle and his men. The town brings death and destruction. It eloquently records the suffering of the Chinese at the hands of a cruel and revenge-seeking Japan. Three priests and five American Sisters of Charity hid in the mountains when the town was razed to the ground, and took these photos from China. These photos show violence that far exceeds the destruction caused by modern bombing attacks. The Chinese were brutally tortured and executed collectively. Although the Japanese had two goals-the airport and the 200-mile railway from Yingtan to Zhejiang Qinnu, the general behavior of the railway was a punitive act because the American pilots got food and treatment here after the attack in 1942. On April 18, 2008, eight missionaries fled China after the raid. They walked, took a bus, and finally took a boat and plane. They arrived in the Western Hemisphere five months later. These photos were obtained in St. Louis from Father Paul Lloyd, director of the Vincent Foreign Missionary Association, and Father George Yager, Vincent who witnessed the attack and provided explanations for the following photos. This hut was the home of the missionaries. They hid in the mountains, while the barbaric Japanese wreaked havoc in the towns of Jiangxi below. Credit: ACME.

Axis raid on Yugoslav guerrillas, May 19, 1943. Yugoslavia-A German anti-party patrol blew up an ammunition depot after tracking a guerrilla supply headquarters somewhere in Yugoslavia. The activities of these patriots forced Hitler to retain a large army in the occupied country. The photo is from a neutral source and was broadcast from Stockholm to New York today (May 19). Image source: ACME Radiophoto;

On May 31, 1943, the French-Egyptian fleet arrived in New York. London-According to a report by Radio Berlin last night, since the fall of France three years ago, the French warship in Alexandria (pictured above) has been controlled by the Allies. The report was not immediately confirmed by any allied source, citing a statement from the Vichy French government, which stated that the fleet “has succumbed to pressure from the United States and the United Kingdom” and that “the crew stated that they would join the allies.” . One battleship, four cruisers, three destroyers, one submarine and some small auxiliary ships formed the Alexander fleet. Credit Line (ACME);

He will not give up, 5/19/1943. Tunisia:-Soldiers and civilians participated in the street fighting before the fall of Tunisia. There is a dead Nazi on the ground-he will not surrender. Before encountering an untimely ending, he had been firing at British soldiers in the garden. Credit Line (ACME);

Nazi tanks in the Nazi cemetery, May 19, 1943. Tunisia:-A German tank suffered a fate similar to that of some Nazi fighters. In the shadow of the cross on the graves of African soldiers killed in the North Africa campaign, British artillery repelled them. The operation took place outside Tunisia. Credit Line (ACME);

Allied forces occupy Tunisia, May 19, 1943. Tunisia:-When Tunisia fell into the hands of the Allies, a British Tommy pointed a gun at a pair of German prisoners he had captured. The three marched past a still burning Nazi vehicle. Credit Line (ACME);

Infiltrator, May 19, 1943. Allied forces captured Nazi spies in Tunisia.

Axis unused bullet, May 26, 1943. Enfidhaville, Tunisia-While traveling in Tunisia, Allied dive bombers launched an attack on Enfidhaville, exploding artillery shells from the train carriage and scattered beside the wrecked train. The fierce Allied air strikes on enemy supplies and communications played an important role in the capture of North Africa from the Axis powers. Image source: ACME.

The Yankees in Bizerte on May 26, 1943. Bizerte, Tunisia-The American patrol squatted by the ruins, waiting for the order to move forward, while another patrol was scouting forward. Before Bizerte became the property of the Allied forces, there were street-to-street, door-to-door battles between the Allied and Axis forces. Image source: ACME.

Bringing the American "Bacon" home, May 21, 1943. Tunisia-On the football field in Sousse, Tunisia, three young Tunisians expected their stomachs to fill up as they carried away the distributed American food. A large amount of American civilian supplies recently shipped to North Africa have been distributed to Tunisians who were starved to death by the Axis powers. These goods include goods that are not available in Tunisia, such as coffee, tea, sugar, biscuits, clothes and materials for making children’s clothing. People will receive a ration card, stamped at the time of purchase. Source: ACME.

The city still stands, May 22, 1943. Tunisia-Although Allied bombers violently bombed Tunisian dock facilities and military targets while Tunisia was still under the control of the Axis powers, the center of the town was almost intact. Soon after the American, British, and French troops entered, Tunisia was not affected by the bomb, which is what it looks like from the air. Only the trench in the lower right corner still reminds people of the war that once raged in Tunisia. Credit: ACME.

What the Allies did to Tunisia, May 22, 1943. Tunisia-In this photo of Tunisia, a British Royal Air Force photographer took this photo of Tunisia shortly after the Allied forces occupied the city. It shows several acres of bombed docks, warehouses and facilities completely destroyed. Although Tunisia’s city centre was barely left by the assailants, Tunisian military targets were still attacked from the air. Image source: ACME.

Smashed to Tunisia, May 24, 1943. Tunisia, North Africa-The day before Tunisia's surrender, the 8th Army infantry rushed to the ridge under the fire of mortars and artillery. After fierce fighting, the British discovered that the capital of Tunisia had fallen unexpectedly quickly. Credit: ACME.

...Barbaric acts in Jiangxi Province, May 25, 1943. In October 1942, Priest Vincent served as a missionary in Jiangxi Province, China. At that time, the barbaric Japanese army visited the countryside and brought to the town that provided assistance to General Jimmy Doolittle and his men. Death and destruction. It eloquently records the suffering of the Chinese at the hands of a cruel, revenge-seeking Japan. Brought out of China by three priests and five American charity nuns, they hid in the mountains and the towns were razed to the ground. These photos show violence that far exceeds the damage caused by modern bombing attacks. The Chinese were brutally tortured and executed collectively. Although the Japanese had two targets-the airport and the 200-mile railway from Yingtan to Zhejiang Qinhua-the overall action of the attack was a punitive one, because the American pilots were fed and treated there. . The raid on April 18, 1942. The eight missionaries fled China after the raid. They walked, took a bus, and finally took a boat and plane. They arrived in the Western Hemisphere five months later. These photos were obtained in St. Louis from Father Paul Lloyd, director of the Vincent Foreign Missionary Association, and Father George Yager, Vincent who witnessed the attack and provided explanations for the following photos. ... Not bombing, but being burned by Japanese infantry, and Yingtan City was turned into ruins. When rescue work began after the raid, a row of Chinese farmers moved slowly among rows of destroyed buildings.

Warning about Bizerte, May 24, 1943. Tunisia Bizelt-When the Germans... were swept out from Tunisia, a crew of a joint... anti-aircraft gun was monitoring... an aircraft from a foxhole fortification... the hull parked at the bottom... The port can be seen in the background...;

Return early, May 30, 1943, Seattle, Washington-These boys fought on Attu, but their wounds took them back to the United States before the death knell of the Japanese army sounded. Resting in the military hospital, the day they are impatient, they will crack again in Nip: (from left to right) Pvt. John E. Terknett, Eastland, Texas; Joseph E. Kenski, Pvt. Detroit, Michigan; James A. Meredity, Pvt. Springfield, Illinois; Woodrow W. French, Pvt., from Greenwood, Mississippi; And sergeant. Forrest W. Johnson of Flat River, Missouri. Passed after review. Credit: ACME;

Two more submarines sank the axis, May 30, 1943. PHILADELPHIA, PA-Today, as the U.S. Navy Manta Ray (left) and the Huck Barker slid down at the Cramp Shipyard, two more subsea fighters defeated the Axis U- in their own deadly match. Boats. The Manta Ray was named by Mrs. Frank W. Finno of Williamsport, the wife of the Navy Cross winner. Mrs. William L. Wright of Corpus Christi, Texas sponsored Hackleback, and her husband was awarded the medal for sinking three Japanese warships and five merchant ships. Credit: ACME;

The first photo of the ascent and landing on the Attu on May 26, 1943. Washington, DC-This photo is the first photo taken by a naval combat photographer during the U.S. landing on Japanese-controlled Attu Island on May 11 last year and was released today in Washington. Photographers who took these landing photos at two points on the island, Holocaust Bay and Holz Bay, were repeatedly exposed to Japanese artillery fire. Here, with the fully loaded landing craft, the soldiers crouched beyond the sniper line of fire, approaching the west arm of Holz Bay. Passed after review. Image source: US Navy photos from ACME;

The last song, May 22, 1943. Somewhere in England-U.S. Army engineers laid the last track for this 17-mile narrow-gauge railway, which was built and operated by the U.S. Army at the British Army Supply Depot. This road was built to transport supplies between the British Army’s warehouses and unloading and shipping points. Credit: ACME;

Rolling, May 22, 1943. Somewhere in England—traveling along Britain’s only railroad built and operated by the United States, this engine transports Army supplies to and from Army warehouses. This 17-mile narrow-gauge railway was built by U.S. Army engineers to facilitate the transportation of equipment. Credit: ACME;

Amtrak in the United Kingdom on May 22, 1943. Somewhere in England-American soldiers pile boxes of supplies on a car traveling along Britain's only railroad built and operated by the United States. The 17-mile railway is built by the Army to transport materials from the British unloading point to the warehouse, or from the American warehouse to the British line for shipment. Credit: ACME;

Dry landing, May 24, 1943. Somewhere in England-everything is ready, nowhere to invade is the plight of these Royal Marines, they are ready to pile up from a landing barge built on dry land. Their faces turned black, and they received instructions from an officer about the "invasion" of the spacecraft in southern England. These fighters have undergone the most arduous training and hope to become the first Allied troops to set foot on the European continent. Credit: Acme;

Smile through, May 23, 1943. London, United Kingdom-This lady rescued her belongings from the bombed home, with a smile on her face, a typical representative of ordinary British people. Even nuisance attacks by enemy bombers could not shake the British confidence in the ultimate victory of the Allied forces. In the face of the threat of Allied invasion, the whole of Africa was conquered, and Nazi Europe was trembling. She knew that the unconditional surrender of the Axis powers was only a matter of time. Tonight (May 23), the Luftwaffe flew over England again, which was more like a "nuisance" raid. Nazi bombers bombed and strafed two coastal resort towns, carrying out one of the worst attacks since the Battle of Britain. Credit: ACME;

Another Nazi "military" target, May 21, 1943. England-British soldiers dig in the wreckage of the auxiliary territorial service building. When a Focke-Wulf fighter bomber hit the hotel directly, at least 12 girls from the organization were killed there. Fifteen enemy planes took part in a raid on the towns on the coast of East England, bombing the streets from the roof and shooting with machine guns. The house was also extensively damaged. Credit: ACME;

The Coast Guard cutter sunk the submarine, May 31, 1943. A German submarine tried to sneak between the fleet of ships crossing the North Atlantic. The Coast Guard cutter escorting the merchant ship found the U-boat, and the Spencer began operations with the help of the Duane. Spencer released a depth bomb and brought the submarine to the surface; then, when the water poured into her crushed hull, she sank, and the Coast Guard rescued her survivors. When she settled in the water, Spencer sank to the submarine and carefully observed the sinking submarine. Note that the Nazis were standing on the deck to the right of the command tower. On the right, Spencer's gun was trained on the U-boat. There are almost no Germans swimming in the water on the right. Image source: US Coast Guard photos from ACME;

Subless Superman, May 31, 1943. The North Atlantic — "Oh, oh, where did that submarine go" is the song these Nazis used to paddle to survive on the US Coast Guard speedboat Spencer, who forced their submarine ships during the recent North Atlantic operation Sunk. The U.S. Coast Guard cutter Duane assisting in the rescue is shown in the background. When the Spencer (right foreground) sent it to David Jones, the enemy submarine was trying to sneak into the middle of a large convoy.

After our bomber left, May 20, 1943. Antwerp-As the voice of "All is well" rushed out of their shelter, the streets of Antwerp swarmed to investigate the damage caused by American bombers in the devastating daytime attack. The photo was recently received in the UK through a neutral source. March 20, 43 (ACME;

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